TV Review: Cursed Season 1 🧙🏻‍♂️⚔️

Cursed is an underwhelming television series that fails to live up to expectations.

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Katherine Langford stars as Nimue in Cursed. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for Cursed Season 1 is spoiler-free.

For a series that was overhyped, Cursed (Season 1, created by Frank Miller and Tom Wheeler), which is based on the book of the same name, was extremely disappointing. With ten episodes in total, the series is a reimagination of an Arthurian legend that follows the story of Nimue (Katherine Langford), a Fey kind “witch”, who is on a quest to fulfil her mother’s dying wish of delivering a mystical ancient sword to a legendary wizard named Merlin (Gustaf Skarsgård).

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TV Review: Warrior Nun Season 1 🗡️

Warrior Nun is an all-female powered series that doesn’t shy away from badassery.

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Alba Baptista stars as Ava in Warrior Nun. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for Warrior Nun Season 1 is spoiler-free.

Warrior Nun (2020, created by Simon Barry) is based on manga-style comic books by Ben Dunn, and its TV adaptation centres on Ava (Alba Baptista), a quadriplegic orphan who died in a Catholic orphanage, but is suddenly revived by a holy relic known as the Halo.

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TV Review: The Baby-Sitters Club Season 1 ☎️

The Baby-Sitters Club is a delightful series about camaraderie, inclusivity and optimism.

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From left to right: Xochitl Gomez, Malia Baker, Sophie Grace, Momona Tamada and Shay Rudolph star in The Baby-Sitters Club. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for The Baby-Sitters Club Season 1 is spoiler-free.

The Baby-Sitters Club (2020, created by Rachel Shukert) is based on a series of books written by Ann M. Martin and has been adapted into various formats before. Netflix’s version is a modern update to a long-beloved franchise of the 80s.

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TV Review: 13 Reasons Why Season 4 🎓

The final season of Netflix’s hit series 13 Reasons Why ended in sombre and I’m glad another season won’t see the light of day.

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Dylan Minnette stars as Clay Jensen in 13 Reasons Why. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for 13 Reasons Why Season 4 contains spoilers.

At last, we bid farewell to 13 Reasons Why (2017—2020, developed by Brian Yorkey), one of Netflix’s most popular teenage series that certainly didn’t deserve four seasons and hour-long episodes. From following this series closely three years ago and reading the novel by Jay Asher that kickstarted this teen drama, I feel glad that this franchise has finally ended, as this series wasn’t meant to survive that long.

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TV Review: Dead to Me Season 2 🌲❤️

Dead to Me returns with an emotionally filled second season of guilt, grief and gratitude.

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Christina Applegate (left) and Linda Cardellini (right) respectively star as Jennifer “Jen” Harding and Judy Hale in Dead to Me. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for Dead to Me Season 2 contains spoilers.

Dead to Me returns with a Season 2 (2020, created by Liz Feldman) where things pick up immediately from where Season 1 left off. Last season ended off with Jen Harding (Christina Applegate) killing Judy Hale’s (Linda Cardellini) ex-fiancé Steve Wood (James Marsden), and Season 2 shows audiences how Jen and Judy are coping with his death and covering up their own involvement in the crime.

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TV Review: Hollywood 🎥🎞

The reimagination of the Golden Age of Hollywood in Netflix’s Hollywood is just too good to be true.

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From left to right: Darren Criss, Jeremy Pope, David Corenswet and Jake Picking star in Hollywood. CREDIT: Netflix

This post for Hollywood contains minor spoilers.

Hollywood (2020, created by Ryan Murphy and Ian Brennan) follows the lives of young actors, writers and directors—Jack Castello (David Corenswet), Roy Fitzgerald/Rock Hudson (Jake Picking), Archie Coleman (Jeremy Pope), Raymond Ainsley (Darren Criss), Camille Washington (Laura Harrier) and Claire Wood (Samara Weaving)—who are trying to make it big in Hollywoodland post-World War II. Murphy rewrites the Golden Age of Hollywood by revisiting old Hollywood tragedies and giving marginalised communities an overly optimistic representation of their struggles.

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